Confusion is never helpful but...

Listen, whenever I tell someone about WordPress.com I immediately have to explain the difference between that site and WordPress.org.

WordPress.org is where you can download the website building software that you install on your website. A lot of people use it. I mean a whole lot. Over 455 million sites use WordPress.

To put that in perspective, it is something like 37% of all sites on the entire internet. Wow but...

Now, all that success overshadows WordPress's other platform, and that other site is where the opportunity lies.

What we are talking about today is WordPress.com. Yeah, I know it’s a little confusing. Confusion never helps, but in this case, there is opportunity here.

WordPress.com is a free, hosted version of WordPress that enables you to build a simple blog or website in just a couple of minutes. It’s essentially a free blogging platform.

Don’t sleep on this one. WordPress.com gets around 340 million visitors a month. Over 21% of that traffic is coming from the United States. That’s over 71 million people visiting this site from America alone.

That’s all well and good but how can you capitalize on all that traffic? How can YOU get a little taste of the glory?

Well the beauty of WordPress.com is it’s “reader” dashboard. It comes with a simple search bar, that when you type in a relevant niche related keyword, it’s going to bring up recent, related topics that are gaining traction.

SO let’s break this down:

1. Use the reader dashboard to find trending niche related articles and content.

2. You can then pick a trending piece of niche related content, take a few bullet points, and think about what your OWN two cents to the conversation would be.

3. Next, write your own piece of content about that subject. Be sure to use a similar, yet not the same headline. Be sure to shout out and reference the original article. Be sure to add your own unique points of view.

For example, if that original article offered 5 ways to get more traffic, perhaps you could summarize that original article, reference it, and then offer two additional ways that you thought would help readers of the original article.

4. Publish that piece of content right there on WordPress.com and be sure to link back to your own assets, products, or website.


As with all these free traffic resources, the key is to be consistent with your actions. Whether that’s publishing consistently or submitting consistently, the free traffic game is all about being consistent with what you do.

Strategies like wordpress.com and Medium (which I mentioned in the last email, compliment each other very nicely.

Imagine publishing 1500 word articles on Medium and then summarizing those articles into 500 word short articles for WordPress that could actually link to the Medium article for a more in depth look.
There are a lot of ways to utilize this kind of strategy, so that you are getting the most out of your content. If I write a 1500 word article, I’m not going to be so quick to move onto the next thing.

I want to squeeze every last drop of content fuel out of that thing. Whether it’s summaries, checklists, cheatsheets, or another form...

... I think it’s important to get more out of the work you put into something.

If writing a 1500 word article is the equivalent of putting in an 8 hour day and getting paid for 8 hours...

... then finding ways to get that content in multiple places in slightly different formats is the equivalent of putting in an 8 hour day and getting paid for 16 hours. It’s a winning formula.

You always want to be on the right side of that “content in/payoff out” equation.

That’s enough for today.

Tomorrow I want to tell you about another resource that is often overlooked, and forgotten but again, it’s something that can be used in conjunction with these others.

In the meantime, checkout WordPress.com and see what you think.

Action is KING!


PS: For full in depth traffic training, check out "The Internet Traffic School"